Posts tagged installation

low-country:

Jasper Rigole - Outnumbered: A brief history of imposture (2009)

OUTNUMBERED, a brief history of imposture, 2009, is an installation that generates a moving image using a found panoramic photograph from 1936. The installation is computer-controlled and generates an aleatoric narrative using an extensive database of people who, in some way, are associated with imposture.

(site)

artistscorecard: 

Jannis Kounellis

It’s not for this form or another, but for creating the possibility of life, no? An attempt to open something outside these walls of convention. With our work we try to open an unconventional road to language, because language is stereotyped and in using language it constantly stereotypes itself. Our task is this: to find the means of opening more ways to communicate. This is what I believe. – Jannis Kounellis. 
Born in Piraeus in 1936 but living in Rome since the mid-fifties, Jannis Kounellis is considered a seminal contributor to the radically and internationally influential Arte Povera group. Literally meaning ‘Poor Art’, this began as an anti-elitist movement promoting a new openness towards artistic production, characterised by the use of antithetical materials such as sacks, beans, metal, coal, coffee, wool and gas. These unusual materials help the artist to manifest visceral “pictures” conveying a sense of the forgotten forces of an archaic world. Often epic in scale, Kounellis’s work possesses a grandeur that reflects his frequent choice of themes and ideas from the past and particularly from Ancient Greece. 
Kounellis began his career as a painter, inspired in part by the work of American abstract artists of the 1950s. However, during the 1960s he abandoned traditional painting in favour of a host of everyday materials with which he created sculptures and installations, using wool, coal, iron, stones, earth, wood and even, controversially, live animals. As a result ordinary objects and natural matter hold a poetic directness and immediacy for Kounellis who is seeking to establish more concrete communication between the viewer and the artwork. via

artistscorecard

Jannis Kounellis

It’s not for this form or another, but for creating the possibility of life, no? An attempt to open something outside these walls of convention. With our work we try to open an unconventional road to language, because language is stereotyped and in using language it constantly stereotypes itself. Our task is this: to find the means of opening more ways to communicate. This is what I believe. – Jannis Kounellis. 

Born in Piraeus in 1936 but living in Rome since the mid-fifties, Jannis Kounellis is considered a seminal contributor to the radically and internationally influential Arte Povera group. Literally meaning ‘Poor Art’, this began as an anti-elitist movement promoting a new openness towards artistic production, characterised by the use of antithetical materials such as sacks, beans, metal, coal, coffee, wool and gas. These unusual materials help the artist to manifest visceral “pictures” conveying a sense of the forgotten forces of an archaic world. Often epic in scale, Kounellis’s work possesses a grandeur that reflects his frequent choice of themes and ideas from the past and particularly from Ancient Greece. 

Kounellis began his career as a painter, inspired in part by the work of American abstract artists of the 1950s. However, during the 1960s he abandoned traditional painting in favour of a host of everyday materials with which he created sculptures and installations, using wool, coal, iron, stones, earth, wood and even, controversially, live animals. As a result ordinary objects and natural matter hold a poetic directness and immediacy for Kounellis who is seeking to establish more concrete communication between the viewer and the artwork. via

fette:

Top, photograph by Anna Gaskell [If anyone knows more about this piece, please let me know. Via. Bottom, Tom Friedman, Untitled (Apples), 2012, made of styrofoam and paint, 68 inches diameter.

From the exhibition New Work, currently on view at Luhring Augustine, New York until March 17, 2012.

The first act of violence that patriarchy demands of males is not violence toward women. Instead patriarchy demands of all males that they engage in acts of psychic self-mutilation, that they kill off the emotional parts of themselves. If an individual is not successful in emotionally crippling himself, he can count on patriarchal men to enact rituals of power that will assault his self-esteem.

Bell Hooks. Via.

sisterspock:

daniel benito cortázar has created ‘snakkes’ 

in collaboration with northern lighting. the lamp whose name translates to ‘talk to you later’
in norwegian is a wall-mounted LED board that allows users to leave messages
on its translucent surface using a wipe away marker.

the playful speech-bubble shaped object is made out of powder coated steel
and acrylic and measures 30.7 x 36.4 x 6.8 cm in total.

‘snakkes’ was on show at the 2011 stockholm furniture fair.

(Source: meggieschwendemann)