gallowhill:

Francis Alÿs - When Faith Moves Mountains, 2002

Alÿs visited Lima in 2000 just before the collapse of the Fujimori government and found ‘a desperate situation that called for an “epic response”, at once futile and heroic, absurd and urgent.’ He returned in 2002 to organise When Faith Moves Mountains, persuading 500 Peruvian students to walk in a line up a sand dune on the outskirts of the city, digging as they went, thus displacing the dune by a few centimetres. The action – Alÿs’s most visually spectacular to that date – was filmed from various positions and the images were subsequently used on postcards, whilst the artist also encouraged the spread of news of the work through rumour and myth. – TATE

watahlily:

aeonum:

thestarlighthotel:

Visiting Mari Andrews’s studio is like stepping into an old-world apothecary’s shop, where rows and rows of small glass jars are filled with specimens gathered on her hikes through Muir Woods, and beyond: molted snakeskins, seedpods, smooth-surfaced stones, rusted bits of wire, tufts of moss, and more … Mari’s work and studio make you encounter overlooked objects in a newly intimate way; a dried leaf or fallen acorn become dazzling when seen out of context and leave you a little more curious, a little more awake to the natural world, than when you arrived.

The rest of the article (and more photos) here.

this is so important to me mari is my soul

Wow

affinitaelettive

Andrea Mantegna (et al.) | Casa del Mantegna

Casa del Mantegna is an incredible example of domestic architecture: it plays (winning) the eternal architectural challenge of inscribing a circle inside a square. From Vitruvio till nowadays many results of this challenge were built, but I can hardly think of a more sensitive house-court. 

The house, built in 1476 by the famous painter, reinterpretates the domus romana (clearly opening it up much more) and the archetype of the atrium: it’s probably thanks to a talk with Alberti that Mantegna actually decides to distribute all the spaces around this central space, giving life to one of the most breathtaking houses built in that period.


Edith Dekyndt, Slow Object 04, 1998 
Reflecting the limits of our perception and revealing the intrinsic particularities of space, Dekyndt’s work invites the viewer to discover intrinsic particularities of space, and individually define them as such. In so doing, her work reflects on what the artist’s calls the “global positions of people”. Her way of working moves beyond the question of identities, and therefore giving her work a political and human meaning on a both universal and highly individual level (our senses cannot be mixed up with those of others). 
Even when her work is often inspired by anomalies associated with the process of seeing, its outcome is the result of a lucid vision of the world. Hands often play a crucial role in this, being the primary means of touching and sensing the world. Since 1999, the artist has called this way of working “Universal Research of Subjectivity”.

Edith Dekyndt, Slow Object 04, 1998 

Reflecting the limits of our perception and revealing the intrinsic particularities of space, Dekyndt’s work invites the viewer to discover intrinsic particularities of space, and individually define them as such. In so doing, her work reflects on what the artist’s calls the “global positions of people”. Her way of working moves beyond the question of identities, and therefore giving her work a political and human meaning on a both universal and highly individual level (our senses cannot be mixed up with those of others). 

Even when her work is often inspired by anomalies associated with the process of seeing, its outcome is the result of a lucid vision of the world. Hands often play a crucial role in this, being the primary means of touching and sensing the world. Since 1999, the artist has called this way of working “Universal Research of Subjectivity”.

We want to think that empathy is this natural quality we all have, and in fact, almost everyone is capable of empathy. But there are these moments in adolescence where kids freeze out these feelings. I spent a lot of time with some of the girls who were bullying Monique [who is profiled in the book], and in moments it chilled me to listen to how dismissive they were in talking about her. But in other reflective moments they would say things like, ‘You know, I see that she’s walking down the hall with her head hanging down and really doesn’t have as many friends as she used to have.’ So it wasn’t that they were incapable of empathy, it was much more that they were in a culture in which they were being encouraged to be cruel to another kid to enhance their own status instead of really letting their feelings of empathy for her have an outlet.
— Emily Bazelon, author of Sticks and Stones, talks to Terry Gross about teens’ capacity for empathy (via matthewnewton)

The stunning home of creative couple Virginine Denny & Alfonso Vallès in Paris where they both live and work. Photography by Petra Bindel.
When I saw it, it immediately captivated me. I mean, what’s not to love about it? Besides being in my all-time favorite city, Paris, its interiors are simply poetic. Of course, it also helps that these stunning images by photographer Petra Bindel, styled by Emma Persson Lagerberg, truly captured the industrial beauty of what once was a button factory. The fusion of styles and casual design is spot on. Love, love, love all the phenomenal artwork and the spontaneous use of typography as decorating elements throughout the place. It’s a smart and inexpensive way of adding an element of surprise and character to any room. View more here 

The stunning home of creative couple Virginine Denny & Alfonso Vallès in Paris where they both live and work. Photography by Petra Bindel.

When I saw it, it immediately captivated me. I mean, what’s not to love about it? Besides being in my all-time favorite city, Paris, its interiors are simply poetic. Of course, it also helps that these stunning images by photographer Petra Bindel, styled by Emma Persson Lagerberg, truly captured the industrial beauty of what once was a button factory. The fusion of styles and casual design is spot on. Love, love, love all the phenomenal artwork and the spontaneous use of typography as decorating elements throughout the place. It’s a smart and inexpensive way of adding an element of surprise and character to any room. View more here 


Rustic Scandinavian home owned by Danish designer/artist, Henrik Busk and his wife Stine. Photography by Bjørn/House of Pictures. »>

507 plays

iman-xo:

Lianne La Havas & Joss Stone - Crazy (Live) - Gnarls Barkley’s Crazy version

I remember when, I remember, I remember when I lost my mind
There was something so pleasant about that place.
Even your emotions had an echo
In so much space

And when you’re out there
Without care,
Yeah, I was out of touch
But it wasn’t because I didn’t know enough
I just knew too much

Does that make me crazy?
Does that make me crazy?
Does that make me crazy?
Probably

And I hope that you are having the time of your life
But think twice, that’s my only advice

Come on now,

Who do you, who do you, who do you, who do you think you are?
Ha ha ha bless your soul
You really think you’re in control

Well, I think you’re crazy
I think you’re crazy
I think you’re crazy
Just like me

My heroes had the heart to lose their lives out on a limb
And all I remember is thinking, I want to be like them
Ever since I was little, ever since I was little it looked like fun
And it’s no coincidence I’ve come
And I can die when I’m done

Maybe I’m crazy
Maybe you’re crazy
Maybe we’re crazy
Probably

 

Gnarls Barkley - Crazy here

fjsdlafkj:

felix-gonzalez torres, untitled, 1991, billboard, photo by peter muscato. felix-gonzalez torres, untitled (blue curtains), 1989/91, 5 light blue curtains.

a memorial to ross laylock who died of aids in 1991.

robert storr: what’s your agenda? who are you trying to reach?

felix gonzalez-torres: when people ask me, “who is your public?” i say honestly, without skipping a beat, “ross.” the public was ross. the rest of the people just come to the work… [..]

talking with felix gonzalez-torres by robert storr (1995)

http://www.queerculturalcenter.org/Pages/FelixGT/FelixInterv.html